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Viewing entries posted in September 2013

Hurricane Juan's legacy lingers

Posted by Andrew Kekacs on 27 September 2013

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On Sept. 28, 2003, Halifax’s beloved Point Pleasant Park was an oceanside haven of walking trails protected by a lush canopy of leaves.

The next morning, 70,000 of its trees were laid out like matchsticks, their roots wrenched from the earth by hurricane Juan — a brawny Category 2 storm that ripped through the Halifax area, across central Nova Scotia and through Prince Edward Island, causing an estimated $100 million in damage.

Read more ... http://metronews.ca/news/canada/808162/hurricane-juans-legacy-lingers-decade-later/

Mi'kmaq ink deal with paper mill

Posted by Andrew Kekacs on 25 September 2013

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Port Hawkesbury Paper signs agreement with Mi'kmaq organization.

Read more ... http://www.isuma.tv/en/isuma-news/nova-scotia-paper-mill-signs-forestry-agreement-with-mikmaq-bands

UN-backed effort helps Kenyans protect forests

Posted by Andrew Kekacs on 19 September 2013

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Bryan Adkins, a Dalhousie University graduate with roots in the Maritimes, is making a big impact on forests and communities in Kenya.

Read more ... http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=44704&Cr&Cr1#.UjrIHcashcb

Carbon markets can have negative impacts, too

Posted by Andrew Kekacs on 14 September 2013

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The development of carbon markets could result in food supply problems and degraded ecosystems unless the schemes are based on more than just paying landowners for planting trees.

Read more at Science Daily ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130913085830.htm

Peru's cloud forests threatened by climate change

Posted by Andrew Kekacs on 12 September 2013

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Peru's cloud forests are some of the most biologically diverse ecosystems in the world.

Read more at Science Daily ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130911184821.htm

Forest questions may lead to deportation for Harrison Ford

Posted by Andrew Kekacs on 11 September 2013

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Indonesia threatens to send Indiana Jones star packing after he raises tough questions about forestry.

Read more at The Guardian ... http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/sep/11/indonesia-harrison-ford-deportation-minister

Biofuel project to fire up in February

Posted by Andrew Kekacs on 9 September 2013

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A Queens County pilot project to convert wood into biofuel aims to be up and running by February after getting additional help from the province.

Read more at the Chronicle Herald ... http://thechronicleherald.ca/business/1151105-biofuel-project-set-to-fire-up-in-february-after-provincial-loan

New Facebook page for OPDF

Posted by Andrew Kekacs on 8 September 2013

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Take a look at what's happening at Otter Ponds Demonstration Forest.

Photos ... https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.189759294538179.1073741830.187894531391322&type=1 

Into the woods

Posted by Andrew Kekacs on 8 September 2013

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CBC

We all know Canadian kids need to be more active.
Now there's a growing movement to get them out into nature for a large part of their day.
The trend - called Forest Schools - has already caught on in Northern Europe, and one of the movement's leading proponents is a Maritimer.

Read more ... http://www.cbc.ca/maritimemagazine/2013/06/10/into-the-woods/

Red spruce recovers

Posted by Andrew Kekacs on 8 September 2013

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Science Daily

In the 1970s, red spruce was the forest equivalent of a canary in the coal mine, signaling that acid rain was damaging forests and that some species, especially red spruce, were particularly sensitive to this human induced damage. In the course of studying the lingering effects of acid rain and whether trees stored less carbon as a result of winter injury, U.S. Forest Service and University of Vermont scientists came up with a surprising result -- three decades later, the canary is feeling much better.

Read more ... http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130830143910.htm

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