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Viewing entries tagged with 'carbon'

New Brunswick environmental group finds success selling carbon offsets

Posted by Christie Verstraten on 24 February 2015

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Community Forests International, a Sackville-based forestry and environmental group, has been making about $70,000 per year on their 71 hectare woodlot by selling carbon offsets to five Canadian companies. These companies are paying CFI to manage this land sustainably.

Find out more here... http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/sackville-environmental-group-sells-carbon-offsets-1.2967255

New NASA probe will study Earth's forests

Posted by Andrew Kekacs on 14 September 2014

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An instrument being developed for the International Space Station will provide a unique, three-dimensional view of Earth's forests, helping to fill in missing information about their role in the carbon cycle.

Read more ... http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/09/140908125817.htm

For trees, an earlier spring than ever

Posted by Andrew Kekacs on 9 June 2014

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Every spring, as the weather warms, trees in forests up and down the east coast explode in a bright green display of life as leaves fill their branches, and every fall, those same leaves provide one of nature's great color displays of vivid yellow, orange and red.

Read more ... http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140605183641.htm

Old trees grow faster, store more carbon

Posted by Andrew Kekacs on 16 January 2014

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For most species, the biggest trees increase their growth rates and sequester more carbon as they age, scientists now say.

Read more ... http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140115132740.htm

Former clearcuts can be future carbon sinks

Posted by Andrew Kekacs on 10 December 2013

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Managing forests for carbon storage can significantly reduce temperatures over the coming century, according to Dale Prest.

Read more ... http://www.symbioticcities.net/index.cfm?pagepath=Blog&id=47596&modeX=BlogID&modeXval=11400&BlogID=11400&action=showcomments&title=Dale-Prest-on-the-Importance-of-Forests-as-Carbon-Sinks-

 

Earthworms and forest soils

Posted by Andrew Kekacs on 30 October 2013

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Vermont scientists ponder the good, the bad and the ugly about earthworms.

Read more ... http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131029133126.htm

Death of a spruce tree

Posted by Andrew Kekacs on 4 October 2013

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Scientists study black spruce growth, death and carbon storage in the boreal forest.

Read more ... http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131002185515.htm

Carbon markets can have negative impacts, too

Posted by Andrew Kekacs on 14 September 2013

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The development of carbon markets could result in food supply problems and degraded ecosystems unless the schemes are based on more than just paying landowners for planting trees.

Read more at Science Daily ...
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130913085830.htm

Red spruce recovers

Posted by Andrew Kekacs on 8 September 2013

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Science Daily

In the 1970s, red spruce was the forest equivalent of a canary in the coal mine, signaling that acid rain was damaging forests and that some species, especially red spruce, were particularly sensitive to this human induced damage. In the course of studying the lingering effects of acid rain and whether trees stored less carbon as a result of winter injury, U.S. Forest Service and University of Vermont scientists came up with a surprising result -- three decades later, the canary is feeling much better.

Read more ... http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130830143910.htm

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